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Recent Posts

  1. BANISHED Wins Erik Barnouw Award

    April 13, 2009

    BANISHED, by Marco Williams, recently was awarded an Erik Barnouw Award, which recognizes outstanding reporting and programming on television or in documentary film that is concerned with American history. From the 1860s to the 1920s, dozens of towns and counties across America violently expelled entire African American communities, forcing

  2. CRIPS AND BLOODS Community Cinema Screenings Recaps

    April 10, 2009

    Community Cinema selections are screened in over 50 locations throughout the United States. This month, Community Cinema presents CRIPS AND BLOODS: Made in America, a film that examines two of the most notorious and violent street gangs in America. Read some of the highlights from this month's screenings and learn more about the live webcast

  3. Watch QUICK FEET, SOFT HANDS This Month on Public Television

    April 9, 2009

    Against the backdrop of Southern League baseball, fiancees Jim and Lisa face the challenge of moving up America's economic ladder. Jim, a minor league shortstop, fights a batting slump while Lisa slogs away to support them. Together they must confront Jim's slump as they cope with the day-to-day realities of being young, married and poor. Check out the

  4. MADE IN L.A. Screens on Capitol Hill

    April 9, 2009

    Filmmakers Almudena Carracedo and Robert Bahar went to Washington, D.C. last week for a screening on Capitol Hill of MADE IN L.A., which documents the lives, struggle and personal transformation of three Latina immigrants working in garment factories. This event included comments and conversation with Congresswoman Diane Watson; Congressman Luis

  5. A Special Screening of MOTHERLAND AFGHANISTAN in San Francisco

    April 8, 2009

    Earlier this week, members of the San Francisco Commonwealth Club gathered for the screening of Sedika Mojadidi's MOTHERLAND AFGHANISTAN, co-produced by ITVS and presented by the Americans for UNFPA. The subject matter of the film is harsh, real and gritty. Afghanistan has the second largest maternal mortality rate in the world. But somehow the film's