Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry Scores a duPont Award

Posted on December 19, 2012

Fourteen winners of the Alfred I. duPont- Columbia Awards were announced Wednesday morning by Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, by filmmaker Alison Klayman, will premiere on Independent Lens in February 2013.

 

The documentary is an intimate and compelling portrayal of an extraordinary artist on the cusp of history in China. Ai Weiwei is arguably the most internationally celebrated Chinese artist of the modern era. At heart, he is a troublemaker with a serious agenda: to challenge the oppression of the Chinese people by their government with rebellious and irreverent gestures. His activism has cost him his freedom repeatedly, but he never seems to lose his childlike approach to serious dissidence executed with a wink. In Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, filmmaker Alison Klayman presents an insightful look at China and its transition in a digital age. 

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