Open Call Recipients: Michael Collins and Marty Syjuco, Filmmakers of GIVE UP TOMORROW

Posted on June 11, 2009
ITVS’s Open Call provides finishing funds for single non-fiction or animation public television programs on any subject and from any viewpoint. Projects must have begun production as evidenced by a work-in-progress video. Check out the clip below with filmmakers Michael Collins and Marty Syjuco, who received Open Call funds for their film GIVE UP TOMORROW, which looks intimately at the case of Paco Larrañaga, a young Spanish mestizo sentenced to death for the abduction, rape and murder of two Chinese-Filipino sisters on the island of Cebu. Learn more about their film, their grueling pre-production schedule and some of the challenges they faced in getting Paco to open up. Interested in applying for Open Call? ITVS is looking for single public television programs on any subject, viewpoint or style. We fund programs that bring new audiences to public television and expand civic participation by bringing diverse voices into the public sphere. This year’s deadline is July 31, 2009. Find more information about Open Call funding >>

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