Dolores

With intimate and unprecedented access, this film tells the story of one of the most important, yet least-known, activists in American history.

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Director

Peter Bratt

Peter Bratt is an award-winning screenwriter and independent filmmaker whose first feature Follow Me Home premiered in competition at the 1996 Sundance Film Festival and won the Best Feature Film Audience Award that same year at the San Francisco International Film Festival. In 2009, he and his brother Benjamin produced La Mission, a feature film shot on Show more location in their hometown of San Francisco. The film, which Peter wrote and directed, premiered at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival and was the opening night film at the 2009 San Francisco International Film Festival, the 2009 New York International Latino Film Festival, and the 2009 Outfest Film Festival in Los Angeles. For his work on La Mission, Peter received the prestigious Norman Lear Writer’s Award and was one of ten American independent filmmakers selected by Sundance and the President’s Committee on Arts and Humanities to launch Sundance Film Forward, a program that uses film and conversation to excite and introduce a new generation to the power of story. Peter is a San Francisco Film Commissioner and a long-time consultant for the Friendship House Association of American Indians, a local non-profit serving the Bay Area’s Native population. Show less

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The Film

Dolores Huerta's fascinating life, from the fearless young woman confronting teamsters on violent picket lines to the activist grandmother nearly beaten to death by a San Francisco police squad, was overshadowed by the legacy of Cesar Chavez. After she was forced from the ranks of the all-male union leadership after his death, Dolores learns the painful truth— that her gender is the greatest obstacle of all. But she turns her defeat into inspiration, setting the course for a lifetime pursuit of equality for all. While tracing Huerta's trajectory through the most radical social and cultural movements of the past 50 years, from brown power and feminism to LGBTQ rights and environmental justice, Dolores provides an unflinching look at the barriers faced by women and people of color within the very communities they're fighting for.

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