ITVS in the News

Posted on November 30, 2011

A sampling of coverage from PBS NewsHour, The Boston Herald, NPRand more…

PBS NewsHour's The Rundown: We Still Live Here Traces Comeback of Wampanoag Indian Language On Thursday's NewsHour, we'll feature an excerpt of the film We Still Live Here, which tells the story of the return of the Wampanoag Indian language, the first time a language with no native speakers has been revived in this country. It's part of our series, in partnership with The Economist magazine, showcasing the art of filmmaking.

Pop Matters: Adama Made Wise Before Her Time "By inviting Adama to speak for herself, David Felix Sutcliffe’s documentary grants her the sort of voice the U.S. government denies her. She runs through a gamut of reactions, rebellious and angry, vulnerable and frightened. She is made wise before her time, and she’s asking questions she wouldn’t have thought to ask had she not been subjected to this ordeal. Still, as she laughs at her best friend Damaris’ graduation ... Adama remains resilient. She maintains a sense of self-identity, despite all efforts to contain and redefine her." 

Boston Herald: Baird Gives A New Voice to Wampanoag It took 150 years, but Wampanoag is once again being spoken on Cape Cod. Connecticut-based documentarian Anne Makepeace’s film We Still Live Here — As Nutayunean chronicles the 20-year-long effort of the Cape and Martha’s Vineyard Wampanoag people to reclaim their native tongue. The PBS Independent Lens series documentary airs Thursday at 10 p.m. on WGBX (Ch. 44). 

NPR’s Tell Me More: Documentary Shows Language Saved From Extinction In 1993, Jessie Little Doe Baird had dreams in a language that her Wampanoag people stopped using more than 100 years ago. The new PBS film We Still Live Here shows how they brought their language back to life. Host Michel Martin speaks with director Anne Makepeace and Troy Currence, vice president of the Wopanaak Language Reclamation Project. 

Visit our pressroom to find additional coverage of ITVS programs >>

Topics

From our blog

  1. When Your Film is About Your Neighbors

    January 17, 2019

    Going home can be challenging in many circumstances, but returning home to capture a nearby community in turmoil can add a whole new layer of complexity.  Rita Baghdadi and Jeremiah Hammerling, directors of ITVS Open Call funded My Country No More, described those challenges and share some insight into capturing the rural community of Trenton, North

  2. In Remembrance of Bill Siegel

    December 11, 2018

    It is with sadness that we say goodbye to filmmaker and educator Bill Siegel. Bill first became a part of the ITVS family with his award-winning film The Weather Underground, which he co-directed with Sam Green. It tells the story of former University of Chicago students who showed their outrage at the Vietnam War and racism in America by waging a low-level

  3. ITVS Achieves Milestone 100th Sundance Film Festival Selection

    December 3, 2018

    Last week the Sundance Institute announced the showcase of independent feature films selected for the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. We are thrilled to share that four of the selections drawn from a record-breaking 14,259 submissions are ITVS co-productions. It's a milestone moment for ITVS. The 2019 festival entries mark 100 ITVS co-productions