ITVS in the News

Posted on November 30, 2011

A sampling of coverage from PBS NewsHour, The Boston Herald, NPRand more…

PBS NewsHour's The Rundown: We Still Live Here Traces Comeback of Wampanoag Indian Language On Thursday's NewsHour, we'll feature an excerpt of the film We Still Live Here, which tells the story of the return of the Wampanoag Indian language, the first time a language with no native speakers has been revived in this country. It's part of our series, in partnership with The Economist magazine, showcasing the art of filmmaking.

Pop Matters: Adama Made Wise Before Her Time "By inviting Adama to speak for herself, David Felix Sutcliffe’s documentary grants her the sort of voice the U.S. government denies her. She runs through a gamut of reactions, rebellious and angry, vulnerable and frightened. She is made wise before her time, and she’s asking questions she wouldn’t have thought to ask had she not been subjected to this ordeal. Still, as she laughs at her best friend Damaris’ graduation ... Adama remains resilient. She maintains a sense of self-identity, despite all efforts to contain and redefine her." 

Boston Herald: Baird Gives A New Voice to Wampanoag It took 150 years, but Wampanoag is once again being spoken on Cape Cod. Connecticut-based documentarian Anne Makepeace’s film We Still Live Here — As Nutayunean chronicles the 20-year-long effort of the Cape and Martha’s Vineyard Wampanoag people to reclaim their native tongue. The PBS Independent Lens series documentary airs Thursday at 10 p.m. on WGBX (Ch. 44). 

NPR’s Tell Me More: Documentary Shows Language Saved From Extinction In 1993, Jessie Little Doe Baird had dreams in a language that her Wampanoag people stopped using more than 100 years ago. The new PBS film We Still Live Here shows how they brought their language back to life. Host Michel Martin speaks with director Anne Makepeace and Troy Currence, vice president of the Wopanaak Language Reclamation Project. 

Visit our pressroom to find additional coverage of ITVS programs >>


From our blog

  1. When Your Film Protagonist Finds You

    March 8, 2018

    ITVS-funded filmmaker Erika Cohn to discuss the unexpected joy in meeting Judge Kholoud and the project that became The Judge.

  2. Using Data to Measure Impact

    February 27, 2018

    How do you know if documentary film makes a difference in the world?  If you’re a social scientist, you evaluate it.That’s what the Aspen Planning and Evaluation Program did in one of the most extensive studies ever to look at the impact of documentary film in a global development setting (173 pages with attachments, for those counting).  The recently

  3. Abacus: Small Enough To Jail Nominated for 2018 Academy Award

    January 23, 2018

    For the second consecutive year, an ITVS-funded film will contend for Best Documentary Feature at the Academy Awards.